But how do you get strangers to visit your site before they know anything about your business? No-follow links are approximately the standard, yet there are modes and spaces to obtain a do-follow link entirely free. For this reason, it’s unwise to try and trick search engines with black-hat SEO tactics. Targeting the keywords to rank in first page of search engine optimization is really a big task. It’s not same for all type of keywords. It’s depend on the type of keyword, type of services you offer and the competition of particular keyword.

Improve engagement by utilising analysis

People spend very little time engaging with content. If the content isn’t right, Get your arithmetic correct - the primary resources are all available here. Its as easy as KS2 Maths or something like that... it’ll be hard to promote it effectively. It’s like creating a product that no one wants to buy. How do you promote something useless? The reason that most SEOs don’t know technical SEO is because they don’t spend enough time meeting and talking to web developers. Basically, Googlebot and other web crawlers follow the links that they find on web pages. If Googlebot finds new links on a page, they will be added to the list of pages that will be visited next. If a link does not work anymore, or if there is new content on a web page, Google will update the index.

Headings and text links

In establishing domain names, you may come across articles, which may suggest not to make use of hyphens on them. You should become aware though that using hyphens on your domain name is not a bad practice. However, you should know that most people these days, are not used to typing domain names on their browsers that come with hyphens. Make sure to link not only to external sources but also to your own blog posts as well. Try to include these internal links as early as possible in your article. What is Thin Content and Why is it Bad for SEO? By Adam Snape on 20th February 2015 Categories: Content, Google, SEO

In February 2011, Google rolled out an update to its search algorithm called Panda – the first in a series of algorithm updates aimed at penalising low quality websites in search and improving the quality of their search results.

Although Panda was first rolled out several years ago (and followed by Penguin, an update aimed at knocking out black-hat SEO techniques) it’s been updated several times since its initial launch, most recently in September of 2014.

The latest Panda update has much the same purpose as the original – giving better rankings to websites that have useful and relevant content, and penalising sites that have “thin” content that offers little or no value to searchers.

In this guide, we’ll look at what makes content “thin” and why having thin content on your site is a bad thing. We’ll also share some simple tactics that you can use to give your content more value to searchers and avoid having to deal with a penalty.

What is thin content? Thin content can be identified as low quality pages that add little to no value to the reader. Examples of thin content include duplicate pages, automatically generated content or doorway pages.

The best way to measure the quality of your content is through user satisfaction. If visitors quickly bounce from your page, it likely doesn’t provide the value they were looking for.

Google’s initial Panda update was targeted primarily at content farms – sites with a massive amount of content written purely for the purpose of ranking well in search and attracting as much traffic as possible.

You’ve probably clicked your way onto a content farm before – most of us have. The content is typically packed with keywords and light on factual information, giving it big relevancy for a search engine but little value for an actual reader.

The original Panda update also targeted scraper websites – sites that “scraped” text from other websites and reposted it as their own, lifting the work of other people to generate their own search traffic.

As Panda updates keep rolling out, the focus has switched from content farms and scraper sites to websites that offer “thin” content – content that’s full of keywords and copy, but light on any real information.

A great way to think of content is as search engine food. The more unique content your website offers search engines, the more satisfied they are and the higher you will likely rank for the keywords your on-page content mentions.

Offer little food and you’ll provide little for Google to use to understand the focus of your site’s content. As a result, you’ll be outranked for your target search keywords by other websites that offer more detailed, helpful and informative content.

How can Google tell if content is thin? Google’s index includes more than 30 trillion pages, making it impossible to check every page for thin content by hand. While some websites are occasionally subject to a manual review by Google, most content is judged for its value algorithmically.

The ultimate judge of a website’s content is its audience – the readers that visit the site and actually read its content. If the content is good, they’ll probably stay on the website and keep reading; if it’s bad, there’s a good chance they’ll leave.

The length of your content isn’t necessarily an indicator of its “thinness”. As Stephen Kenwright explains at Search Engine Watch, a 2,000 word article on EzineArticles is likely to offer less value to readers than a 500 word blog post by a real expert.

One way Google can algorithmically judge the value of a website’s content is using a metric called “time to long click”. A long click is when a user clicks on a search result and stays on the website for a long time before returning to Google’s search page.

Think about how you browse a website when you discover great quality content. If a blog post or article is particularly engaging, you don’t just read for a minute or two – you click around the website and view other content as well.

A short click, on the other hand, is when a user clicks on a search result and almost immediately returns to Google’s search results page. From here, they might click on another result, indicating to Google that the first result didn’t provide much value.

Should you be worried about thin content? The best measure of your content’s value is user satisfaction. If users stay on your website for a long time after clicking onto it from Google’s search results pages, it probably has high quality, “thick” content that Google likes. The number of external links you receive is important. Some of the top SEOs say external links are simply invaluable to your ranking power.

Self-publishing Parasite SEO based purely on social media

A trustworthy, dedicated web optimisation industry should take the time to understand your company and its ethos. If nofollow links do not influence the position of a web page in the search results, why should use use these links? Of course, a link without the nofollow attribute is much better. However, nofollow links can still have a very positive influence on your website, even if the effects are indirect: The theory behind this concept is that website which use a keyword often are likely extremely relevant to that keyword, however, overuse of that keyword may result in penalties to the website if the search engine deemed the keywords are not being used appropriately. Gaz Hall, from SEO Hull, had the following to say: "When you research keywords for your future content and come up with the list, always narrow down the list and keep only the most relevant ones. "

Tactics around 301 redirects

If your site has a blog with public commenting turned on, links within those comments could pass your reputation to pages that you may not be comfortable vouching for. When I'm always shocked by TAP Assess, in this regard. using internal links, it’s important to link to the page with descriptive keywords. That helps your rankings and your visitors as everyone will have an easier time figuring out what the article you link to is about. Search has penetrated the very fabric of global society. The way people work, play, shop, research, and interact has changed forever. Organizations of all kinds (businesses and charities), as well as individuals, need to have a presence on the Web—and they need the search engines to bring them traffic. In order to get the authoritative links that Google respects and sustain your search rankings, you need to concentrate on getting contextual links (i.e., links surrounded by relevant content).